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Addict Aide / Social Media Addict

by Contagious I/O

This story originally appeared on Contagious I/O, our intelligence tool featuring the most creative and effective ideas in marketing from around the world

A French addiction organisation created a fictitious Instagram personality to show people how easy it is to miss the signs of alcohol abuse

Addict Aide created a glamorous Instagram persona to teach young people about the insidious nature of alcoholism.

The French addiction organisation worked with BETC, Paris, on the campaign, which was called Like My Addiction.

The agency created an Instagram account under the name Louise Delage and posted photos of a 25-year-old Parisian woman travelling and partying. Over two months, 150 images were posted to Delage’s account, which attracted over 12,000 followers.

At the end of the summer, Addict Aide posted a video revealing the hoax. The film pointed out that almost every photo of Delage showed her holding an alcoholic drink before imploring people to think about the drinking habits of those close to them.

 

Contagious Insight / 

The medium is the message / In 2015 we interviewed Dr Erin Marie Saltman, from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, about creating counter narratives to fight online radicalisation. In the interview, Saltman described how a successful counter narrative relied on the right message, the right platform and the right messenger.

‘Those three really need to work well together for your target audience to actually want to click on it and watch it,’ she said.

Addict Aide and BETC have achieved that trinity with Like My Addiction.

Using a chic, Parisian woman as the messenger was far more likely to win young people’s attention than a charity, and more likely to create an attachment with people. Similarly, the choice of Instagram as the platform and glamorous pictures as the message are both well suited to the young, hard-to-reach audience (accepting BETC’s argument that, in this instance, the medium is the message makes no practical difference).

Clued up / The only question mark hanging over the campaign is how successful it was at duping the audience. A few people reference Delage’s drinking in earlier posts (although the comments are not dated) and social media users have a knack for sniffing out bogus accounts.

Either way, the reveal by Addict Aide has not angered anyone. Few brands or government bodies could get away with a deception like this, but charities have leeway here. Most likely, people feel as though the means are justified by the ends.

 

 

This story originally appeared on Contagious I/O, our intelligence tool featuring the most creative and effective ideas in marketing from around the world. I/O helps anyone in the world of marketing understand why brands are innovating, how they're doing it and with what success.

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