News & Views

Emerald Nuts / Yes Good

by Contagious I/O

This story originally appeared on Contagious I/O, our intelligence tool featuring the most creative and effective ideas in marketing from around the world

Nuts brand scours Amazon for weird-but-positive reviews and builds a campaign around them

Emerald Nuts appropriated a laconic review of its products (‘yes good’) and made it the brand’s strap line, in a self-consciously quirky campaign.

In June 2016 an anonymous Amazon user gave Emerald Nuts a five star review and left ‘yes good’ as a comment. The brand, which worked with Barton F Graf in New York, has since made this spartan remark the foundation of its new campaign, which brings to life customer reviews with quirky animations and films.

Emerald Nuts created a website and a film to talk about the origin of the ‘yes good’ tag line, and the brand has promised to buy the anonymous reviewer all the items on their Amazon wish list if they come forward. The reviewer’s publicly view-able wish list comprises a watch, a wireless doorbell and a vacuum cleaner.

Other bizarre-but-positive reviews are being brought to life through animations and films, which the brand is seeding on social media and has collated in blog called Revue of Reviews. Emerald Nuts has said it will continue to scour the internet for more reviews that can be made into ads, encouraging more people to write them in the hope they get featured in an ad.

 

Contagious Insight / 

Comedy review / People have been mining Amazon reviews for comedic purposes for years. In 2009 A t-shirt depicting three wolves howling at the moon became a best-seller on the retail site after ironic reviews of the item went viral.

Nielsen has previously reported that online consumer reviews are the second most trusted source of brand information (after personal recommendations from friends and family). You could argue that Emerald has found an entertaining way to incorporate the persuasive positive reviews into its advertising, and then created a system that encourages more people to leave positive reviews in the hope that they get used as part of the campaign.

That said, it’s just as likely the campaign will attract attention because it’s different and exploits a type of humour (so naff it’s good) that has proved popular among online communities.

 

 

This story originally appeared on Contagious I/O, our intelligence tool featuring the most creative and effective ideas in marketing from around the world. I/O helps anyone in the world of marketing understand why brands are innovating, how they're doing it and with what success.

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